Weekly Notes 4/2023

This edition of the Weekly Notes is almost a week late. There isn’t much to write home about this week. It was spent being busy at work and looking forward to the Star Party.

A Wish for 2023

I read this post by Scott Galloway on his predictions for 2023. But, what struck me was this phrase in the last paragraph:

I hope 2023 brings you health, prosperity, time with loved ones, and the presence to appreciate all three.

Scott Galloway

I think of this as a good twenty first century replacement for what I had learnt in school – healthy, wealthy, and wise lesson.

Weekly Notes 03/2023

OTT

The OTT list that I promised last week is still pending.

Personal Health

The throat infection has dragged on. I am back on anti-infectives. This has affected my output this week as well.

Tinkle 10 year digital subscription

I took a 10 year digital subscription to Tinkle. I want to try and read this together with Kid 1.

Bullet Journal

I liked Hiran’s adaptation of the BuJo that he mentioned in his newsletter. I am now trying it out.

Weekly Notes 02/2023

I have been reading Thejesh’s Weekly Notes for more than a month now. I think this would be a nice way to round-off my non-work stuff.

Bullet Journal

I have kept a bullet journal since 2017. I have followed the dotted grid journal since I started. I bought three dotted grid journals last year but was disappointed by the quality of the dots. Some were too bright. Some were too light. I decided to switch to a square grid journal. I am enjoying journaling in this journal.

An image of the dotted grid journal page.
A square grid journal

The square grid also helps with my eyesight.

Personal

Kid 2 has been keeping me busy. This week I wasn’t able to support my wife with night time child care as I had a throat infection which led to a case of cough. This also kept me away from work for the first three days of the week. I was mostly sleeping.

Tweets

This section may not survive long. When I stop tweeting, I get emails from Twitter which point me to a few interesting tweets. Over the weeks, the emails have become much better at pointing out what tweet I might read. So, I mostly read those tweets only.

YouTube

I have moved from watching the more popular YouTubers to watching an interesting second-tier of creators whose videos I like to watch. These include My First Million, Paul Millerd, Chalchitra Talks (and their sister channel Kitaabi Cabins), Matt Ragland, Jared Henderson, struthless and Money Malayalam.

Two videos that I enjoyed watching this week:

OTT

I watched a bunch of stuff on OTT which I have still not compiled here. I will put them together in a different post and link to it here in the future. I will remind you about it next week, in case you forget.

Deep Reset

Cal Newport defines the deep reset as:

an intentional reconfiguration of your life to amplify the small number of things you’ve learned through experience that you value and minimize those things that get in their way.

Cal Newport

He first introduced the idea in a blog post in 2020. I did not understand it then but he fleshes out the concept beautifully in episode 219 of the Deep Questions podcast. You can listen to the YouTube chapter on The Deep Reset.

I resonated with the way he went through the relationship demographic populations had with work. Specifically, the reaction millennials are now having to work. Cal suggests the deep reset as an intentional process of the millennials reaction to work.

Hanif Kureishi

The writer Hanif Kureishi is in a hospital in Italy.

I enjoy reading his tweet threads. Someone on Twitter had shared it earlier this week which is when I read it cursorily. I forgot who.

I found it again in the Scroll’s daily digest. They have a nice summary of the context and his tweets so far. He has a newsletter, as well.

Many of his writing in the past have been controversial.

Regulation in the Space Sector

The space sector is compliance heavy. It needs to comply with various national and international laws. In the absence of national laws, compliance requirements are a la carte right now.

India’s private sector space regulator gave a few green signals this year. It authorised the launch of Skyroot’s sounding rocket from the Sounding Rocket Complex. It authorised the launch of satellites from Pixxel and Dhruva Space on the PSLV.

Right now, the regulator regulates only the private sector. It does not seem to regulate launches from NSIL. This is like the RBI not regulating public sector banks. This comparison does not stand up much because NSIL provides much better service and because the private sector is in its infancy.

The question to ask is how is the regulator, IN-SPACe building capacity to do its job? When there is a proliferation of startups in a sector that the Government has just opened up, how does a regulator provide adequate regulation?